comenity

Comenity Bank Decided to Approve Me then Later Deny Me – Not Cool!

I don’t know if Comenity Bank and United are in-bed with one another, but both seem to giveth and taketh away. Here’s the story:

 

Approved, then denied, in that order

Last week I applied and was instantly approved for the Virgin America Visa Signature card, $10k credit limit. This took place on 4/23 and I was informed that the card would show up in 7-10 days. The card did indeed show up, but that’s not the problem.

I received card in the mail on 4/29 and called to activate via the automated system. After three attempts it would not activate so I called and spoke with a CSR. The CSR stated that my account was subsequently closed on 4/27 due to “high risk, too many recent inquiries”. The CSR, Rachel, also stated that it was an automated system that arrived at the decision to reverse my approval. This, they say, is the same automated system that automatically approved me four days earlier. What gives?

 

comenity
Approve or deny me, but don’t do both!

Either way IS fine

I asked for a manager, to which she obliged after having no rebuttal for my questions. Simple questions I might add, such as, “did you run my credit again on the 27th?” “If you didn’t run it again, “why would the same automated system return different results while processing the same data”. She said, “I can happily get you in touch with a supervisor.”… Please do.

Supervisor ‘Joe’ stated that although it is rare, he has seen Comenity approve accounts and then later deny them after an internal audit. He also stated that it is within the Bank’s legal right. Well no duh, do you think an auditor or automated system be trained/programmed to doing something illegal. I thought that was a lame deflection on his part.

I asked him, to which he almost seemed ready for, “and this automated internal audit took place on the same day your bank stopped accepting new applications for the VX cards?” Like clockwork, he stated that the two events had nothing to do with each other. I call BS.

Any who, Comenity approved me, then denied me 4 days later, the same day they stopped accepting new applications for the card. My feeling is that an influx of churners, like myself, started applying for this card as they were beginning the phase-out and they had to go in and cut some of us off like the blood-sucking leeches we are. No shame.

I don’t know if the “4/27 new card application shutdown” was due to lack of funding or if it had been in the works. I predicted they would be closing the Virgin America cards just one week ago. (The main reason I applied for this card)

Recap:

I have been approved for over 50 credit cards and never have I had a card denied after being approved. I took to Webster’s to see what approved really means.

verb: “officially agree to or accept as satisfactory”

As you can see and probably imagine, I am annoyed. I wasted about 40 minutes on the phone, on a Saturday. I had a credit inquiry go to waste, never fun. And worst-of-all, a bank, in my opinion, closed my account down because they targeted accounts of potential churners as they phased out a product. (speculation on my part, would love other data points)

My issue is that they approved me and then later denied me. Why not just put me in pending-review and then deny me after an internal audit? Why not send an email so I don’t spin-my-wheels trying to activate a card that is dead.

Comenity may have received an influx of applications from churners, like myself, who knew this card was going to be dissolved. I don’t buy the fact that their automated system found “new high risk data” on my report – the same data they pulled four days earlier. I think they sent auditors through because they ran out of funding for the card.

So, to Comenity and United, all I ask is that you don’t give someone a product or service, then take it away. Figure out a better way to vet customers before boarding and before approval. The best part of all, the supervisor says to me, “This is probably going to leave a bad taste in your mouth”.. I said, “you’re probably right”.